Easy Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread – Fall Into Delicious

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gluten-free pumpkin bread

Looking forward to the smell and taste of oven-fresh pumpkin bread with the cooler weather? If you have celiac disease (problem digesting gluten) or follow a gluten-free diet, baking may be a challenge. However, knowing which baking flours, and tips to use, will make your recipes crave-worthy.

Nothing says fall like pumpkins. Try the moist and flavorful pumpkin bread recipe below to impress your gluten-free friends and family. This tasty snack is a gifting favorite.

Easy Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread - Fall Into Delicious
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Easy Gluten-Free Pumpkin Bread - Fall Into Delicious
Rate Recipe!
Votes: 3
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe!
Print Recipe
Servings2loafs
Prep Time15minutes
Cook Time1 hour
Ingredients
  • 2 cups gluten-free oat flour (or other gluten-free flour)
  • 1 1/2 cups 1:1 gluten free flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 2 teaspoons nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 2 3/4 cups sugar
  • 2/3 cup water
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1/2 cup oil
  • 5 eggs, beaten
  • 1 15 ounce can canned 100% pure pumpkin (not pie filling)
  • 1 cup nuts (optional)
Servings2loafs
Prep Time15minutes
Cook Time1 hour
Ingredients
  • 2 cups gluten-free oat flour (or other gluten-free flour)
  • 1 1/2 cups 1:1 gluten free flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 2 teaspoons nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 2 3/4 cups sugar
  • 2/3 cup water
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1/2 cup oil
  • 5 eggs, beaten
  • 1 15 ounce can canned 100% pure pumpkin (not pie filling)
  • 1 cup nuts (optional)
Recipe Instructions
  1. Grease two 9x5x3-inch loaf pans. In a large bowl mix together all of the dry ingredients.
  2. Blend in the water, applesauce and oil; then mix in the eggs.
  3. Blend in the pumpkin.
  4. Optional - fold in the nuts.
  5. Divide the batter between the prepared pans.
  6. Bake at 350°F for one hour, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

According to Beyond Celiac, there are a variety of gluten-free flours available including those listed below.

Almond Flour

Also called almond meal, it is made from finely ground almonds. Flour made with skin-on almonds will have a darker color. Almond flour without the skin is made from blanched almonds and has a light ivory color. Almond flour adds a delicate almond flavor and gives structure to baked goods. You can make your own by pulsing whole raw almonds or whole blanched almonds in a food processor.

Buckwheat Flour

Surprisingly, buckwheat is not wheat and contains no gluten. It has an earthy flavor (kasha is buckwheat), so use it where you will enjoy the unique taste

Coconut Flour

Made from defatted coconut, this flour has a delicate coconut flavor, pale ivory color, and is high in fiber. Use it in sparingly in cakes, muffins, pancakes and cookies. With too much coconut flour, baked goods can be dry.

Corn Flour

Masa harina is made by mixing dried corn kernels that have been cooked and then ground with water and shortening or lard. The dough is dried to create masa harina. It is used in making tortillas and arepas. Cornmeal and blue cornmeal are simply ground corn. Look for whole grain brands, for more fiber and nutrients.

Millet Flour

This is a mild-flavored, light-colored flour, making it perfect for using in either sweet or savory recipes.

Rice Flour

Brown rice flour is ground from rice that still has the bran and germ attached, so it is higher in fiber and nutrients than white rice flour and it has an earthier flavor. White rice flour is ground from white rice and is very light in color and almost flavorless.

Oat Flour

Oat flour has a mild flavor and works well in sweets and breakfast breads. It is a whole grain and adds fiber and nutrients to baked goods. You can make your own by processing gluten-free rolled oats in a food processor or blender until finely ground.
Note: not all oats are gluten-free. Check the packaging. Also, not everyone with celiac disease can tolerate oats. Be sure to talk to your doctor before adding labeled or certified gluten-free oats into your diet.

Many grocery stores carry gluten-free flour mixes, which are often a combination of several different gluten-free ingredients. On the negative side, these mixes cost more than regular flour.

A full list of 15 types of gluten-free flours can be found here.

Gluten-Free Techniques To Improve Your Baking

Mix It Up

Many recipes call for a ‘just mixed’ or ‘lightly combined’ batter to avoid the rubbery texture associated with over mixing. However according to test kitchen experts a well-mixed batter is better for gluten-free muffin and cake batters.

Give It A Rest

Gluten-free flour alternatives often give baked items a sandy texture. If you notice this problem, often allowing extra time for the flours and starches to soften before baking helps.

Bake It Longer

Extra moisture is used in gluten-free baking to keep items moist. But this sometimes leads to an under-cooked or gummy texture. The solution? Adding extra baking time. Often the starches need extra time to set, so the ‘clean toothpick’ test may take longer. Try to add time in five minute increments to ensure your items are not over baked.

 

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